There are good things and bad things about a remote location, say 60 miles inland from the mouth of a river. For one thing the chance of being attacked by an enemy’s rampaging armada is signifi- cantly reduced. On the other hand, it is just so, you know, remote. 

The Maliseet peoples had long inhabited the area around this bend in the Wolastoq (“beautiful riv- er”), pulling salmon from the pools and gathering berries from the bogs. In the 1690s Joseph Rob- ineau de Villebon, who was in charge of the French colony of Acadia, was enamored by the defen- sive possibilities of this location and constructed Fort St. Joseph where the Nashwaak flowed into the French-named St. John River. He declared it the Acadian capital and indeed a British expedition was repelled in 1696. But the place was too far from everything and the French soon packed up and moved across the Bay of Fundy to Port Royale. 

After several more decades French settlers tried again on the south side of the river with a village they called Pointe St. Anne. It would be abandoned after reaching a peak of 15 families and 83 residents. Permanent settlement (save for a few fur trappers) finally arrived with British Loyalists hightailing it out of the new United States in 1783. When New Brunswick achieved formal colonial status the following year governor Thomas Carleton also declared nascent St. Anne’s Point the cap- ital since it was so far from the coast and potential American incursions. He also changed the name to honour the second son of King George. 

The British set about constructing all the requisite government and military buildings in Frederic- ton and set up the bones of the future University of New Brunswick. There would eventually be
a brisk trade in lumber and some leatherworks and some carriage building but the main economic driver of the town would be government and education. In the 1840s the Anglican Church was making plans to build a cathedral, the first on British soil in about 300 years. The prospect of such a significant undertaking in a frontier capital with fewer than 10,000 souls was so troubling that Queen Victoria stepped in a elevated Fredericton to the status of “city” so construction could pro- ceed. 

England envisioned Fredericton as a miniature London perched on an inland river in the New World. It never quite worked out that way. Fire was a regular visitor: 1849, 1854, 1880, 1911. Spring flooding when the ice began to break up in the St. John River was another problem, even with dams built to divert the flow. But plenty of consequential buildings have survived and we will begin our explorations at one of the many architectural ornaments that grace the roomy streets laid out in the original town plan in 1785... 

1.
City Hall/Phoenix Square
397 Queen Street at northwest corner of York Street

This space has traditionally been the social and civic hub of Fredericton. It is also no stranger to the ravages of fires - the first public building constructed here was called the Tank House because it was constructed over a water cistern used to fight fires. That was in 1822 and a fire alarm bell was added to the cupola shorty afterwards. No doubt the name “Phoenix Square” evolved from the frequent rebuilding from the ashes.

Even the Tank House was not immune; it went up in flames in 1850. So too did the market house that replaced it (in an 1867 blaze) and the next one that followed (1875). It was at this point the current three-storey brick City Hall arrived and it is now the oldest municipal government seat in Atlantic Canada still in active use. There was plenty more going on here than governing, however. There was a jail in the building and the first floor boasted an 810-seat opera house with a horseshoe balcony. It remained an active stage into the 1930s. 

The striking French Second Empire design was contributed by architects John Thomas Charles McKean and G. Ernest Fairweather, who were just beginning a long and busy career in Saint John. The central clock tower soars 115 feet above the street and houses a clock crafted by the firm of William Gillett and Charles Bland in London. England. The company would construct over 14,000 towers around the world during its existence from 1844 until 1950. The price tag for this one was $1,748.83 and included the services of Edmund Becket, 1st Baron Grimthorpe and designer of the mechanism for the clock of the Palace of Westminster, who supervised the installation. The total tab for City Hall was $32,500. 

ON THE WESTERN EDGE OF PHOENIX SQUARE, AT QUEEN STREET IS THE...

2.
Randolph Building    
371 Queen Street

Nothing is known about James Charles Philip Dumaresq’s architectural education but the Sydney, Nova Scotia native hung out his shingle in Halifax in the early 1870s after working as a carpenter. For the next three decades he would do much to shape the Victorian streetscapes in the Maritimes. For this commercial building raised in 1878 for Archibald Drummond Fitz Randolph, Dumaresq mimicked the appearance of the new City Hall next door with similar building materials and a prominent ornate corner tower. Randolph was born in Digby before leaving at the age of 17 to clerk in a Saint John stove store. By the time he was 22, in 1855, he was running his own business. He commissioned this large building to help handle his thriving wholesale grocery trade with the West Indies. In Fredericton, Randolph was also involved in lumber, bridge building, a lime-kiln operation, banking, insurance, the Brunswick Street Baptist Church and, especially, the temperance movement to end the scourge of drinking. After the Randolph family business dissolved the building became the home of The Daily Gleaner, which put out its first editions in 1880.

IN FRONT OF CITY HALL IS...    ‘

3.
Freddy the Nude Dude
397 Queen Street at northwest corner of York Street

After a fund raising effort led by Mayor George E. Fenety, monies were raised to install a three-tier cast iron fountain in a pool of water in front of City Hall in 1885. The fountain was fabricated by J.W. Fiske & Company in New York City. Joseph Winn Fiske started the company in 1862 and did a brisk trade in decorative American Civil War memorials. For the Fredericton fountain a gilded zinc figure of a cherubic angel was placed on top. To the locals who passed by the fountain everyday he became known as Freddy the Nude Dude.

Freddy had an impish side. When the wind blew he delivered a sometimes icy shower to passersby from his lofty perch. To tame these mischievous instincts the fountain was reduced from three tiers to one. In 2013, after 128 hard years on the job, Freddy was sent to an Alabama foundry for rehabilitation. A Freddy clone was developed out of aluminum and outfitted with a wind sensor to control water flow and the fountain was restored to three tiers. The original Freddy was restored to a glass case in City Hall.

WITH YOUR BACK TO FREDDY, TURN LEFT AND WALK ALONG QUEEN STREET, CROSSING YORK STREET. 

4.
Provincial Normal School/Justice Building
northeast corner of Queen Street and York Street

After designing City Hall Saint John architects John Thomas Charles McKean and G. Ernest Fairweather won the commission to design the Provincial Normal School as well. Sited in the western edge of the former Military Compound that was used by British Imperial regiments until 1869, the school opened in 1876. The core of the building was destroyed by fire in 1929, leaving only the shell of the building and the original Gothic-flavoured entrance on pink granite pillars. A modern, larger and decidedly un-Gothic looking structure was built again. The facility eventually became a Teachers College until the 1960s when it was preserved as a Provincial Justice Building. The stone and ornamental iron fence was added by McKean and Fairweather in 1879.

WALK THROUGH THE FENCE AND INTO THE MILITARY COMPOUND, CONTINUING TO MOVE EAST ON THE WALKWAY. ON YOUR RIGHT IS THE... 

5.
Soldiers’ Stone Barracks
Military Compound

With American independence won in the 1780s British Loyalists streamed into Fredericton, the newly minted capital of New Brunswick. Two town blocks were set aside for the British military to protect the colony from whatever the United States now had in mind. The garrison did not consider it safe to leave until 1869 and the eve of Canadian independence. After that, new buildings were erected on the former military grounds (the Normal School and eventually the Liquor Commission Building that became the New Brunswick College of Craft and Design) but military souvenirs survived as well. The Soldiers’ Barracks here were constructed with wood but was redone with stone before the winter of 1827. The Canadian Army selected Fredericton as the post for the first infantry unit of the Canadian Permanent Force in 1883 and put the barracks to use. But after World War I the building mostly did duty as a warehouse until its preservation.

AT THE END OF THE WALKWAY, ON YOUR LEFT, IS THE...

6.
Guard House
Military Compound

This relic from 1828 provides one of the earliest glimpses of British military architecture in New Brunswick. The sandstone building features cut stone window trim and quoins and a colonnaded porch under a wide hipped roof - the British military engineers did not settle for mere functionality. This was the hang-out for the regiment’s 12-man guard team; there were seven windowless cells for miscreants in the back and a pit dug underneath the building for solitary confinement. The Guard House has been restored to its mid-19th century appearance when this was the stomping grounds of the British 15th Regiment and is open for public inspection.

TURN LEFT ON CARLETON STREET.

7.
Militia Arms Store (Visitor Centre)
11 Carleton Street

The British scattered 61 buildings around the Military Compound and this is the only wooden structure remaining. Its purpose was to store muskets and ammunition for the Fredericton militia. It has been repurposed as a visitor centre.

8.
Carleton Street Armoury
11 Carleton Street

This sandstone-and-brick military building with a faint castle-like front was constructed as a drill hall in 1885. The military still goes through its paces here.

9.
Fredericton Public Library
12 Carleton Street

The newest building constructed on the former Military Compound is the Fredericton Public Library that arrived in June of 1975. It is the most patronized library in New Brunswick, forcing an expansion in 1990.

TURN AND RETURN TO QUEEN STREET. TURN LEFT AND CONTINUE TRAVELING EAST.  

10.
John Thurston Clark Memorial Building
503 Queen Street at northeast corner of Carleton Street

This French Second Empire ornament with a lively interplay of brick and stone was constructed in 1881 as the city post office and customs house. It boasts a high mansard roof, and a prominent central tower with iron lacework at the roofline. The design came from the Dominion’s Chief Architect’s Branch and was hailed by the proud citizenry when it opened. After the government moved on the building served a myriad of purposes, including as a library. It also picked up the name of John Thurston Clark, a long time booster of the YMCA and community activist in Fredericton. The building has been the home of the New Brunswick Sports Hall of Fame since 1996. 

11.
Old Post Office
527 Queen Street

This Beaux Arts mail dispensary replaced the post office next door in 1916 after three years of construction. There was no mistaking the importance of this government edifice with its rusticated Newcastle sandstone facade, full-height Ionic portico, and toothy centre pediment. David Ewart of the Federal Department of Public Works drew up the plans and his original design was even more formidable - a domed 100-foot clock tower was once part of the composition but it had to be dismantled for fear it would collapse. 

TURN LEFT AND WALK BACK INTO THE MILITARY COMPOUND. THE LARGE BUILDING FACING OFFICERS’ SQUARE IS...

12.
Old Officers’ Headquarters
Military Compound

This handsome military headquarters is actually two buildings that replaced the brick-and-wood original quarters from 1792.. The section closest to the St. John River (on your right as you face the building) boasts much thicker walls than its more-sheltered counterpart nearer to Queen Street. The river end was constructed between 1839 and 1841 and the later section finished in the early 1850s. The two were segregated by a brick fire wall. The structural timbers evolved during that time as well, moving from thick handhewn framing to sawn timbers. The building now houses the York-Sunbury Historical Society Museum and Officers’ Square is a popular gathering site for town festivals and concerts. 

13.
Lord Beaverbrook Statue
Officers’ Square, Military Compound

William Maxwell “Max” Aitken, 1st Baron Beaverbrook, turned out to be one of the great media moguls of the 20th century. But he never forgot his idyllic childhood growing up in New Brunswick where his family moved in 1880 when he was one year old. He got his start in business selling insurance and becoming a law clerk in Chatham. Beaverbrook became one of the greatest benefactors a province could ever have and in 1957, seven years before his death, this bronze statue was raised in his honour.  

EXIT THE MILITARY COMPOUND AND CROSS SAINTE ANNE’S POINT DRIVE. TURN LEFT AND WALK DOWN TO THE RIVER.

14.
Lighthouse on the Green
St. John River

The St. John River is navigable for small craft between Saint John and Fredericton. Over the years more than two dozen small lighthouses guided the way for navigation. This was not one of them. It was constructed by entrepreneur Robert Hansen in 1989 to help out the boat tour business. The city took over its operation in 2002 and later sold it to the Crowne Plaza Lord Beaverbrook Hotel. It may not be historic but the views from up top are great and you can grab some grub from the restaurant when it is open. 

TURN AND RETRACE YOUR STEPS BACK TOWARDS QUEEN STREET. ON YOUR LEFT IS...

15.
Lemont House
605/607 Queen Street

This restrained Second Empire abode features an unadorned brick exterior and the trademark, more ornately rendered, mansard roof. Martin Lemont came to New Brunswick from Maine in 1843 and began an existence much-scarred by fire. He started the first variety store in the province in 1844 but the business and his house were both destroyed in a conflagration in 1850. There were more forced moves by fire in 1854 and 1859. He eventually set up Lemont and Sons at 338 Queen Street with spawn William and Martin. That location was hit by fire as well in 1874 but only the back of the store was destroyed. Martin died in 1881, around the time this house was being constructed.

CONTINUE TO QUEEN STREET AND TURN LEFT.

16.
Government of Canada Building
633 Queen Street at northeast corner of Regent Street

In the middle of the 20th century the federal government made a concerted effort to provide smaller towns with impressive, convenient government buildings in which to do business. Fredericton’s came in 1950 and is representative of the form with its geometrical Art Moderne appearance. Clad in limestone, the building spreads across the block from its formal two-story main entrance. 

17.
York County Court House
649 Queen Street

In the 1860s you could come here to do your grocery shopping on the ground floor and get sentenced to jail upstairs. The unusual arrangement ended in the 1880s when the produce moved out and the entire space was given over to matters of justice. The courthouse was constructed over the years 1857 and 1858 as one of the first public buildings in town to be built from fire-battling brick. It is still the earliest surviving brick courthouse in New Brunswick. John Davis was responsible for construction and he did not go overboard with decorative flourishes, closely adhering to classical principles in fenestration, cornice development and corner quoining.

18.
Fredericton Convention Centre
670 Queen Street

The capital city’s premier meeting place opened in 2011 with 36,000 square feet of flexible space. Even without a meeting planned you can still wander around inside and admire local art on display. A large ceramic wall mural by Craig Schneider on the second floor is composed of over 800 individually hand-painted ceramic tiles. Its name Wolastokuk derives from the Maliseet word for strolling along the St. John River.

19.
The Playhouse
686 Queen Street

In 1964 Lord and Lady Beaverbrook filled a gaping hole in New Brunswick culture by giving the province its first large-scale performing arts facility. The Georgian Revival-styled building featured 1000 seats and a stage designed primarily for touring acts. Celebrated Canadian theatrical producer James de Beaujeu Domville helped with the details. In 1972 the auditorium was shaved to 763 seats and state-of-the-art technical capabilities added along with the fly tower and box office.

20.
Lord Beaverbrook Hotel
659 Queen Street

Built in the tradition of Canadian Pacific Railway grand hotels, the Lord Beaverbrook Hotel opened in great style in 1948 with Sir Max Aitken being one of the first to sign the guest book. Most of the money for its construction came from Aitken’s pockets and the profits were ploughed directly to New Brunswick charities. Be sure to take a moment and admire the beaver mosaics on the exterior.

21.
Beaverbrook Art Gallery
703 Queen Street

In 1953 Lord Beaverbrook offered Fredericton a fully stocked art gallery if he was provided with a site. So the city ponied up some prime waterside acreage and got out of the way. Neil McMartin Stewart, who maintained an architectural practice in Fredericton for over twenty years, provided a fresh modern design, faced with pale semi-glazed brick. The building is trimmed in white marble quarried at Philipsburg, Quebec. Lord Beaverbrook curated the original collection of 300 mostly British paintings that he had purchased himself. Today the collection has expanded twelvefold and the exhibit space has gone through several expansions.

22.
Legislative Assembly Building
706 Queen Street

A fire in 1880 left New Brunswick without a seat of government. J.C. Dumaresq, a veteran of the Randolph Building, prevailed in a design competition for the new provincial assembly building with a symmetrical French Second Empire confection composed around a projecting 144-foot high tower crowned with a cupola. The expansive government quarters had room for the Council and Assembly Chambers, the Supreme Court and a library when it opened in 1882. Spoon Island Granite was carted in from Gagetown and combined with Dorchester sandstone to execute the plans. Greeting visitors inside is an impressive self-supporting spiral staircase. If the legislators aren’t busy making legal sausage the Assembly Chamber is open to the public to look around; if the Legislature is in session visitors may watch without comment from the gallery.

23.
Educational Building
710 Queen Street on east side of the Legislative Assembly Building
The core of this building is the oldest public structure in the city, constructed as office space for Provincial Secretary William F. Odell in 1816. It was just a one-story rubble stone building back then but was bulked up considerably in 1869 with a storey of cut stone and an attic added on top. The Educational Building is notable for its wooden Greek Revival entrance door, unique in Fredericton. While Greek Revival architecture was all the rage in North America between 1820 and 1860 the style never floated down the St. John River.  

24.
Crocket House
796 Queen Street at northeast corner of Church Street

Until the 20th century a log cabin constructed before the town was laid out stood on this corner. In 1900 go-to Victorian-era builder Joshua Limerick then assembled one of Fredericton’s best Queen Anne designs here for local politician Edward Moore, who was the lead investor of the Hartt Boot and Shoe Factory. The corner conical tower is a standout architectural feature but the house is also notable for its eclectic roofline, decorative shingles, whimsical fenestration and pedimented entrance supported by a small parade of Ionic columns. The house is most associated with A. Pierce Crocket, a physician who lived here for 40 years. In recent times this has been the home to Gallery 78, the oldest private art gallery in the province.

TURN RIGHT ON CHURCH STREET.

25.
Beauregard
97 Church Street at northwest corner of King Street

This was a standard no-nonsense five-bay Georgian house, the kind one would expect to find a High Sheriff of York County living in. Which Benjamin Wolhaupter, a watchmaker by trade, was when it was constructed in the late 1840s. When William T. Whitehead acquired the property in 1905 he went to work bringing the structure into the Victorian age. Onto the corner went a cylindrical bay. A couple of dormers went into the upper floor and a street-facing veranda supported by a platoon of Ionic columns was tacked on down below. It was known as “Beauregard” and would not have been out of place on a plantation in the American South.

WALK ACROSSCHURCH STREET ONTO THE ISLAND.

26.
Fredericton War Memorial/Cenotaph
Queen Street, King Street and Church Street

This 14-foot shaft of white granite was dedicated on Armistice Day 1923 to remember the 109 Fredericton soldiers who perished in World War I. Plaques were added to include the names of fallen soldiers in wars to come. The carved stone base is one of the largest blocks of cut granite in Canada - 26 tons.

WALK ACROSS KING STREET ONTO THE GROUNDS OF...

27.
Christ Church Cathedral
168 Church Street

The Anglican diocese of Fredericton was established in 1845 and first bishop John Medley hit the ground running. Medley was an English clergyman who was a leading cheerleader for Gothic Revival ecclesiastical architecture. He sailed to Fredericton with Frank Wills, a 23-year old architect, in tow. Wills based his design for Christ Church on the 14th century St. Mary’s Church in Snettisham, Norfolk. While the project staggered along in constant need of funds, Wills designed and built St. Anne’s Chapel of Ease on George Street for regular services. Wills left in 1848 to practice architecture in New York City and celebrated British church architect William Butterfield was recruited to design a choir and tower. Medley had wanted twin spires but there was barely money for one; he drew up plans for the cathedral’s spire himself. Tracery and stained glass started togo in during 1850. Services began in 1853 by which time Christ Church was hailed as one of the finest church buildings in the land and was already influencing Gothic Revival meeting houses across British North America. Lightning struck the spire in 1911 and melting bells ignited a fire that caused enough damage to require a year to rebuild at a cost of $100,000.

RETURN TO KING STREET AND TURN LEFT, HEADING WEST.

28.
Smythe House
774 King Street

Fredericton has grander homes but this hosue from 1787 paints a picture of what most of Fredericton looked like in the 18th century when Loyalists began arriving to remake their lives. The foundation is fieldstone and mortar was used in only a few top courses. The floor plan was simple, a two-room front parlour and a back kitchen. Which is what this house was before additions.

29.
Edgecombe House
96 Secretary Lane at northeast corner of King Street

This somewhat odd Queen Anne Revival home sports nearly identical first and second floors. Its most eye-catching feature is the corner tower topped by an onion dome. The house was constructed in 1897 for Alfred G. Edgecomb who with brothers William and Norman assumed the carriage manufacturing business of their father John after his death in 1890.

30.
736 King Street

Three of the Edgecomb boys passed on joining their father’s carriage trade and struck out in the dry goods business. Frederick Edgecombe led the way and also dabbled profitably in real estate. In 1896 he poured a chunk of that money into a Victorian makeover for an otherwise unassuming five-bay Georgian-style house. When the contractors were through there was a wrap-around porch, massive dormers, conical corner tower, a pediments entrance and other accouterments. In the grass median between the sidewalk and the street you can find an embedded tile which is believed to have been placed there so Mrs. Edgecombe could step down onto from one of the family carriages. 

31.
Departmental Building
96 St. John Street at northeast corner of King Street

This government building joined the Fredericton streetscape in 1888, courtesy of Saint John architect Robert C. John Dunn. Dunn adapted some of the elements of the burly Richardsonian Romanesque style pioneered by Boston architect Henry Hobson Richardson that was popular with local governments at the time. Some of its trademarks seen here are rough cut stone, a bold arched entrance with polished stone columns, and round-headed windows grouped in three. Look for a brass plaque on the front steps that marks the high water mark from the flooding St. John River after an ice jam on March 19, 1936.

TURN AND RETRACE YOUR STEPS DOWN MAIN STREET TO THE TOUR STARTING POINT.

32.
Centennial Building
670 King Street at southwest corner of St. John Street

This six-storey International Style glass wall structure joined the roster of Fredericton government buildings in 1967. In recent years occupancy has declined and without a massive renovation this controversial icon of mid-20th century modernism will not see Canada’s second 100th birthday.

33.
New Brunswick Electric Power Commission
527 King Street

Utility companies across North America favoured the stripped down classicism of Art Moderne architecture for their massive operational buildings. This one was constructed in 1949 on plans drawn by John L. Feeney who had been City Engineer for the City of Fredericton in 1910 before joining the New Brunswick Electric Power Commission. Ornamentation is limited to the stylish letter carving, fluted pilasters and an impressive entry lobby decked out in marble and brass. 

34.
Wilmot United Church
473 King Street at northwest corner of Carleton Street

After an 1850 fire destroyed the previous church on this location the Methodist congregation, which had started in 1791 with 12 members, chose to rebuild again in wood. Saint John architect Matthew Stead blended Gothic and Georgian elements into the city’s largest church building. Named for the province’s first native-born Lieutenant Governor, Lemuel Allan Wilmot, the auditorium could hold 800 worshipers. The church also boasted the tallest spire in Fredericton - 199 feet with a seven-foot wooden hand pointing towards the sky, carved by Edward Charters. The hand was removed in 1974 but is still on display in the Sanctuary.

TURN LEFT ON CARLETON STREET AND CONTINUE ACROSS BRUNSWICK STREET INTO... 

35.
Old Burial Grounds
entrance on Brunswick Street

Town planners penned in this space as a public square but it was needed as a burying ground more after the early winters in Fredericton proved especially brutal. The first internment was for an English military officer named Anthony Foster in 1787; his gravestone is still visible. Other notable landmarks include a monument to Loyalists on Brunswick Street and another to British soldiers along the central path. Burials continued here until the 1900s.

WALK THROUGH THE BURIAL GROUND AND EXIT ONTO GEORGE STREET. TURN RIGHT.

36.
St. Paul’s United Church
224 York Street at southeast corner of George Street

Fredericton’s first Presbyterian church, the Old Kirk, was dedicated on this corner in 1832. It was large enough to accommodate 600 worshippers but for its 50th anniversary esteemed Nova Scotia designer James C. Dumaresq was invited to design a new sanctuary. Dumaresq delivered a High Victorian Gothic creation highlighted by a soaring 160-foot tower and spire. When the Rothesay limestone church was ready in 1886 it featured space on multiple levels for 1,000 congregants. The final bill was about $25,000. The original Presbyterian church building was shuffled off to 433 York Street where it eventually disappeared inside an apartment building.   

TURN RIGHT ON YORK STREET.

37.
Old Fredericton High School
York Street at northwest corner of George Street

All manner of students have been educated on this site since the Baptist Seminary Building was erected here in 1835. When that building was razed in 1891 for a new high school 19th century Maritime provincial building stars - architect James Dumaresq and contractor Joshua Limerick - arrived to take on the job. The eclectic Victorian composition trimmed in olive freestone greeted its first students in 1893. Over the next 32 years, 925 students took their diplomas here. Fredericton High School, the oldest English high school in Canada, then moved on to George Street and this building was made an elementary school. The class bell rang for the final time in the 1960s. In its latest incarnation the City has purchased the property to save it from demolition and repurpose the space for residential living. 

38.
Brunswick Baptist Church
161 York Street at northwest corner of Brunswick Street

It is a familiar Fredericton origin story for this Gothic church crafted from local purple-gray sandstone - it was built in 1883 as a predecessor for one that burned. The Brunswick Street church project was one of the last in the prolific career of Saint John architect David Elson Dunham. Dunham was only 23 years old when the Saint John Daily Telegraph published a lengthy endorsement of his work as a provincial designer who “unlike other trained architects had not enjoyed the advantage of European study or travel thus turning his lack of professional experience into a positive attribute.” Dunham would die prematurely at the age of 43, the same year this church was erected. The congregation had united with the Queen Street Baptists in 1869. 

39.
Fisher House/McAdam’s Funeral Home
160 York Street at southwest corner of Brunswick Street

This Neoclassical building began life in the 1870s as a Carpenter Gothic house for George Frederick Fisher, editor of the New Brunswick Reporter and a one-time mayor of Fredericton. After Fisher died in his 50th year in 1894 the Victorian bones of the house were re-arranged to face York Street instead of Brunswick Street and dressed up in a variety of Ionic columns. It is now a funeral parlour.

40.
Clark Building
390 King Street at northwest corner of York Street

From his base in Halifax, James Dumaresq was not lacking in commissions in the Capital Region. This one came in 1899 from W.G. Clark who sold farm machinery, tools, carriages and sleighs. The ground floor of this three-storey corner building has been compromised by a brick facade but look up to see the original Romanesque influences of arched windows punctuated with carved keystones. In 1915 the Clark family would open the first Chevrolet dealership on the opposite block and are still selling the General Motors nameplate a century later on Prospect Street. 

CONTINUE WALKING ONE MORE BLOCK ON YORK STREET TO THE TOUR STARTING POINT.